Bipolar Disorder

Balancing the Ups and Downs

Gaining Balance in Your Life

Daily life can feel like a rollercoaster before the official diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder. The constant ups and downs and mood swings ranging from depressive lows to manic highs can wreak havoc on you and those you care about most. Struggling with understanding how you can go from such highs to such lows is one of the many reasons to talk with your P.S. Psychiatry provider. Together, we can help address your symptoms and help you get back to living a more balanced life where you’re in control.

Understanding the Highs and Lows

Signs & Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

Everyone experiences the ups and downs of life. For some people, though, the highs and lows are very frequent and can be pretty uncomfortable for you and those that love you. Understanding what you’re experiencing is the first step in getting the help you deserve. To help you talk with your P.S. Psychiatry professional, we created this brief list of common signs and symptoms for you to reference.

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Extreme Sadness: Feeling depressed or extremely sad without an external cause to match the intensity of your feeling for a significant period of time.

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Racing Thoughts: You feel like your mind is going 100 miles an hour, and you can’t keep track of all of your thoughts.

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Mood Swings: You feel, or others report, that you have extreme, quick, and/or frequent changes in mood with no significant external cause.

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Surges of Power/Energy: You feel a decreased need for sleep, possibly staying up multiple days or only sleeping for brief periods of time.

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Risky Behaviors: Engaging in sexual or non-sexual behaviors where you would likely get in trouble if you got caught.

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Inflated Self-Esteem: The sensation that nothing can stop you and that you cannot lose. This typically leads to impulsive decisions with potentially significant consequences.

We're Here to Help

Treatment Options

We understand that Bipolar Disorder can feel exhausting and scary. You’ve probably already tried things to help yourself, but below are a few things that can help reduce or even eliminate some of your symptoms.

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Medication: A prescription from your P.S. Psychiatry provider can help with your Bipolar symptoms.

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Evaluation: A formal Neuropsychological Evaluation is critical in obtaining a formal diagnosis and an appropriate treatment plan.

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Therapy: Talking with a licensed therapist is a great place to learn different strategies to navigate your Bipolar symptoms.

Questions about Bipolar Disorder

Understanding Bipolar Disorder

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Do medications for Bipolar Disorder make you feel sedated and like a zombie?
Your psychiatrist will be able to alert you of the medication's side effects. If a medication makes you feel sedated or like a zombie, you can talk with your P.S. Psychiatry provider to see if a different medication would be more appropriate.
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I was just diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder by my psychologist. How do I find the right psychiatrist to prescribe medication?
All providers at P.S. Psychiatry commonly treat Bipolar Disorders.
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Can my family doctor give me medication for Bipolar Disorder?
Family doctors will prescribe medication for moderate anxiety and depression. However, once mental health symptoms become more severe, family doctors will most likely recommend that you see a specialist, like the providers at P.S. Psychiatry.
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How do I repair the family relationships I have ruined because of my Bipolar Disorder?
Family therapy can help you begin to repair the relationship issues that bipolar episodes may have caused. If you’re interested in starting therapy, let your P.S. Psychiatry staff member know.
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Will my Bipolar Disorder ever go away, or do I have to take medication forever?
There is currently no cure for Bipolar Disorder. However, research has shown that symptoms tend to become milder with age. Currently, a combination of medication and talk therapy is the best form of ongoing treatment to manage symptoms.
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Is there more than one type of Bipolar Disorder? It doesn’t feel like my highs and lows are as extreme as I’m reading about in others.
There are two different types of Bipolar Disorder: Bipolar I and Bipolar II. The length and severity of both manic and depressive episodes will vary for both types of bipolar disorder. The main difference between the two types lies in the severity of the manic episodes caused by each type. A person with Bipolar I will experience a full manic episode, and a person with Bipolar II will experience only a hypomanic episode, which is less severe and destructive than a full manic episode.
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What are the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder, how do I know if I have it?
Bipolar Disorder has two types, Bipolar I and Bipolar II. Both have highs in the form of manic states and lows in the form of depressive states. The difference is that in manic states with Bipolar I, a person will experience more intense symptoms, and in Bipolar II, a person will experience less extreme symptoms.
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Gain Control Over Your Symptoms

We’re Here to Help

When you’re ready to talk, we’re ready to listen. Fill out the form below to get in touch with P.S. Psychiatry and schedule your appointment.

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